iHeinrich

just trying to find the answer…

Linux Distro of Choice

If you ask 20 people who  use Linux, “what is the best version of Linux?” you will probably get 20 different answers.   If you’re lucky.

There is actually a website dedicated to tracking every distribution of Linux called,  DistroWatch.

Choosing a version of Linux can be daunting, but it ultimately comes down to what are you looking for in an operating system.

I wanted a version of Linux that had the following specifications:

  • Well documented. When everything goes south, I can’t call somebody, so give me a wikipage I can read.
  • Well supported by a community of users. Many distros are “here today, and gone tomorrow”. That means I need to learn the ins and outs of a new system every few years? No thank you, I am busy enough.
  • Works well, easy to use, doesn’t require a lot of maintenance.
  • Regularly updated. I was looking at one variant of Linux, that looks GORGEOUS, but it hasn’t been updated in over a year.
  • Offers a variety of developer tools. This is a minor consideration, as most Linux distros can use all the same tools.

So which Linux ticked all my boxes? Fedora.

Currently at version 27 (as of this writing), I have been using it a few months now and I am very happy with it.

  • It’s very well documented.
  • It has great community support. In fact, the good people at Red Hat Linux sponsor Fedora.
  • Has it’s own “magazine” with regular tips and tricks for users of all levels. I liked the article which showed how to change your boot up window to a Hot Dog.
  • It works great. Try it yourself.
  • It’s regularly updated, and they release a new update every six months or so. Fedora 27 was released Nov 14th, 2017, and Fedora 28 is expected May 1st, 2018. Upgrading is pretty easy.
  • Has all the software tools and toys you could ever want.

Give it try! It’s light years better, faster, and more secure than Windows.

Mr Hot Dog says, "Eat me!"

Mr Hot Dog says, “Eat me!”

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1 Comment

  1. David Lieberman

    I’ve been using Ubuntu as my primary dev environment for ten years. Haven’t tried Fedora as a desktop, but over the years I’ve experimented with other flavors like CentOS and Mint, and while they were fine, none was compelling enough to get me to disrupt settled practices. It’s not that I’m religiously devoted to Ubuntu, it’s more that I rely on a certain amount of settled practices and muscle memory to get me by and free me to think about the actual problem in front of me.

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